Spiritualists, Abolitionists, and Socialists—An unholy trinity

By Al Benson Jr.

Contrary to the politically correct of our era, there are some things the Lord sees as an abomination besides the supposed sin of “white racism.” Deuteronomy 18:10-12 gives us a small sampling. Scripture says: “There shall not be found among you any one that maketh his son or daughter to pass through the fire, or that useth divination, or an observer of times, or an enchanter or a witch, Or a charmer, or a consulter with familiar spirits, or a wizard, or a necromancer. For all that do these things are an abomination unto the Lord: and because of these abominations the LORD thy God doth drive them out from before thee.”

An Encyclopedia of Religion published by the Philosophical Library in New York in 1945 says of Spiritualism that it is: “A religious-philosophical cult which is given to the study of psychic phenomena and which holds that these are to be explained in terms of discarnate spirits who have a lively interest in the living. Spiritualism was formerly inaugurated (at least in this country) in 1848,…” In 1848, gee, what a surprise! It seems that 1848 was a banner year for all sorts of apostate goings on, from the socialist revolts in Europe that gave us “Lincoln’s Marxists” to the advent of Spiritualism here. Don’t supposed there are any connections do you? Naw, all sheer coincidence—nothing to see here folks, just move along.

I recently came across an interesting site on the Internet (another reason it has to be “regulated” for our own safety and good) called http://www.alternatehistory.com that gives a brief overview of Spiritualism for many of the years in the 19th century. For 1848 it states: “Failed revolutions in Germany and other parts of Europe. The 48’ers, as they are called, are settlers from Germany across the Mid-west. Mostly leftist in their views, some out right Communist, they are open to conversion to the Spiritualist movement, except for the extreme Communists who view all religious ideas as evil. In 1860, they will vote for Lincoln and, some say, turn Iowa, Illinois and Indiana from Douglas to Lincoln, winning the election for him.” Then they go on to 1858: “The Spiritualists support Lincoln in the state election, although he still loses. It is greatly rumored, correctly, that Lincoln is a member of the Spiritualists. Most Abolitionists are Spiritualists, or share some views with them. Mainstream Churches have begun to be influenced by the Spiritualists, mostly in ideas of Mediumship…1859—Spiritualist John Brown leads a revolt of slaves at Harper’s Ferry. It fails.” Brown was an abolitionist/terrorist, but I’ve never heard of him being a Spiritualist up to this point. But the article continues: “1860—American Civil War. Volunteers from the Midwest introduce ideas of Spiritualism to other groups of people. 1 out of 4 Union soldiers are foreign born, a majority of which are German Spiritualists. One such German Spiritualist is Charles Schurz.” I think, here, the author must be referring to Carl Schurz because I couldn’t find a Charles Schurz anywhere having to do with that time period. Although I did find one reference which mentioned that he had a sister in Chicago that was into Spiritualism. And in researching for this article I came across a book, The Psychic Life of Abraham Lincoln written by a Susan B. Martinez, and it listed some of Lincoln’s friends who were Spiritualists—and on the list were Robert Dale Owen, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglas, and Carl Schurz. This is the first I ever heard of Schurz being a Spiritualist—if this is accurate. When Donnie Kennedy and I did our research for Lincoln’s Marxists we came across a ton of information on Carl Schurz. We still have it, filed along with documentation on all the 48’ers we wrote about in our book, and I don’t recall seeing anything about Schurz having a connection with Spiritualism. Author Ann Braude in her book Radical Spirits doesn’t mention Carl Schurz either, and she pretty well covered the Spiritualist Movement in this country during the 19th century—from a positive viewpoint.

Braude noted that: “Radical abolitionists, in turn, found in Spiritualism a religion in harmony with their individualist principles. Abolitionist’s interest in both woman’s rights and Spiritualism derived from their fierce loyalty to the principle of individualism.” This goes along with what I stated about the Abolitionists in an earlier article, that they had an agenda that encompassed far more than the slavery issue. They were, in fact, the change agents of the 19th century. And Braude observed, on page 27 of her book: “As already noted, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison was an early convert and remained loyal to the movement until his death. The famous Grimke sisters, Sarah and Angelina, talked to spirits…Mary Todd Lincoln spoke with her dead son, Willie, and brought mediums into the White House, where they conducted séances for senators and cabinet members.” And Lydia Maria Child wrote in 1862 that “Spiritualism is undermining the authority of the Bible in the minds of what are called the common people faster than all other causes put together.” That also from Braude’s book on page 28. Take a look at what Child was saying. The aim of Spiritualism was to undermine the authority of Scripture. The Abolitionists often did the same thing and the Socialists had this as a main part of their agenda. If you don’t think so, then read The Communist Manifesto.

If you look at all of this together, it would seem that the Confederacy was combating much more than just the Union armies, as bad as they were. There were spiritual issues involved in the War of Northern Aggression that are never brought up in the “history” books. All they ever prattle about is the slavery issue and the Abolitionist’s own leaders admit that, over and above that, they had other agendas in mind, some closely paralleling those of the Marxists.

The “late unpleasantness” was, at its core, a war of theologies every bit as much as one of economic issues. And because it was a theological war it was also a culture war—and this is why it has never really ended for the Yankee/Marxist mindset—they only told us it did, and unfortunately, we took their word for it.

We have got to get it through our heads that “those people” are still at war with us and they will be until they manage to destroy our culture, with its Christian roots, and our heritage. Folks, we have got to learn to start fighting back and not be content to just lay prostrate with the dictator’s boot on our necks. There are some ways you can fight back.

Take your kids out of their propaganda mills and if you can’t afford a good Christian school then teach them at home. It’s not as hard as most of you have been led to believe it is. Start educating yourselves while you still have the Internet so you realize what’s going on in the country. That takes a little bit of work but it can be done, and when you do start to learn some truth, put it in letters to the editor of your local paper. They haven’t been totally censored yet. I know lots of folks that write letters to the editor and get them printed. And start seceding from the Sodom on the Potomac culture around you. I realize this all flies in the face of the Reality Show mentality you are bombarded with, but be willing to forego that rather dubious pleasure for the sake of your children and grandchildren because, in the final analysis, you are doing this for them, not yourself. And if you are a Christian, then you should be doing all this to further the Kingdom of God, because, in the end, that is the Kingdom that will triumph and it would be nice to be able to say that, by God’s grace, you had even a small part in that victory.

Abolitionism, Spiritualism, and Women’s Lib

by Al Benson Jr.

The radical Abolitionist Movement in the North (separate from the conservative abolitionist movement in the South) in the years from the 1830s through “reconstruction” at the end of the War of Northern Aggression, was the cause of many problems that we are still faced with today, two of which are the modern “Women’s Liberation Movement.” and the “Civil Rights Movement.”

Many in our day, without a correct understanding of the real intent of the Abolitionist Movement, have sought to draw a parallel between it and today’s Pro-Life Movement. This is something that should never be done. The contemporary Pro-Life Movement is able to stand on its own without resorting to the apostate underpinnings of 19th century radical abolitionism.  Radical abolitionism in the 1800s produced men of the stripe of abolitionist/terrorist John Brown. His solution to the slavery problem was to execute slave owners, or even potential slave owners during late night visits to their homes while their wives and children were forced to stand by and watch the executions. Should the present Pro-Life Movement ally itself with such a history? If it does so then it will be to its own hurt one day.

Although there were undoubtedly some Christian people in the Abolitionist Movement, by and large, it was an experiment in rank apostasy. Many of its adherents had become enamored of the strange doctrines of Spiritualism  that so permeated mid-19th century America.  Yet others had become devotees of Unitarianism–yet another form of apostasy from Christian truth.

In her book Radical Spirits author Ann Braude  observed that: “Every notably progressive family of the nineteenth century had its advocate of Spiritualism, some of them more than one…The ubiquitous  Beecher family contributed Charles Beecher  and Isabella Beecher to the ranks, while Harriet Beecher Stowe became a serious investigator…As already noted, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison was an early convert and remained loyal to the movement until his death. The famous Grimke sisters,  Sarah and Angelina talked to spirits.” All of these people were abolitionists and all, according to Braude, were involved in Spiritualism. Every wonder why your history books forgot to mention any of this?

Braude’s book, on page 60, noted that: “Radical abolitionists, in turn, found in Spiritualism a religion of harmony with their individualist principles. Abolitionists’ interests in both  women’s rights and Spiritualism derived from their fierce loyalty to the principles of individualism. Radical abolitionists agreed with Romantics and Transcendentalists that the church, the clergy, and the Bible were so many enslavers of the human spirit. They also believed that individualist principles required constant agitation in order to effect the transformation of society.” Braude here has come out and admitted what many of us have been saying for years, that radical abolitionism was about much more than freeing slaves–it was about the transformation of our society. In other words, those people were the practitioners of the Marxist “Critical Theory” agenda in their day, even though that term had yet to be coined. They wanted no interference from the Christian Church as they sought to denigrate the Christian culture around them and replace it with their own. Their agenda was to remake American society in their own image–a not-so-subtle form of idolatry.  Is this really any different from what is going on today?

One of the leaders in the 19th century Women’s Lib Movement was Susan B. Anthony. They put a postage stamp out with her picture on it several years ago. Another author, Kathleen Berry, in her book Susan B. Anthony took a little different tack on Anthony’s worldview. She noted that: “In her autobiography, Elizabeth Cady Stanton described Susan’s spirituality as that of an agnostic. Susan never denied the existence of God, but her beliefs were secularized and lodged in the world around her. Her father, who had grown increasingly frustrated with the limited world view of the Quakers…turned to the Unitarian Church. Susan was also sympathetic to Unitarian beliefs.” So, however you take it, Spiritualist or Unitarian, Anthony’s beliefs were a radical departure from orthodox Christianity–and this was the foundation for Women’s Lib!

Braude, in Radical Spirits has identified Spiritualism as being present at the Women’s Rights convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. She has stated, quite plainly, that: “From this time on, Spiritualism and Women’s Rights intertwined repeatedly  as both became mass movements that challenged the existing norms of American life.  The two movements shared many leaders and activists.”

It is worth noting, coincidentally, that the Spiritualist Movement in this country began to make its inroads right around 1848, the same year that the socialist and communist revolts began in Europe. In fact, one of the female “Forty-Eighters,” Mathilda Franziska Anneke, wife of socialist agitator Fritz Anneke, once she came to America, became one of the leading lights in the Women’s Rights Movement.  Walter Kennedy and I, in our book Lincoln’s Marxists document quite a bit of this. Anneke worked closely with Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton  and even lobbied in Washington in behalf of Women’s Rights.

This gives you a brief overview of the connections between the radical abolitionists, the Spiritualists, the Unitarians, and some of the Forty-Eighters, and the Women’s libbers. Just for a moment, stop and reflect on what these people have done to our once-Christian culture while the church-at-large has continued to slumber.

Writer Henry Makow Ph.D. noted, in an article published back in 2010 that: “The Women’s Liberation Movement was patterned on the Civil Rights Movement.  They are off-the-shelf Communist psycho-social operations. To be effective, they must appear to reflect a popular groundswell rather than an elite agenda from above.” Makow felt these movements might have rectified some genuine injustices, but then said “…their hidden purpose is to destabliize American society.” He’s right. Undoubtedly he is referring here to the contemporary version of the Women’s Rights Movement rathen than the 19th century one, but no matter how you look at it, it’s all of one fabric and it all has, as the main agenda, the destruction of Christian culture in this country. We need to begin to wake up and understand this.