Nullification is Spreading

by Al Benson Jr.

Member, Board of Directors, Confederate Society of America

Recently I did an article on nullification in Arkansas. As things in this country continue to deteriorate under the Harris/Biden Regime more states are beginning to deal with the process of nullification as noted in the Constitution.

Ron Kennedy, in his informative book Be Ye Separate–Bible Belt Revival Or Marxist Revolution has noted, on pages 62-63 that: “The founding fathers crafted a federal system for a Constitutionally limited Republic of Sovereign States. They understood that no word, sentence, clause, or amendment in the Constitution was self-enforcing. They understood that a free government required moral people. They also understood that, under their system of federalism, the Sovereign States would be able to enforce the Constitutional limitations on the federal government.” This is what nullification was all about–preventing the federal government from going beyond the bounds of what the Constitution allowed. This is something the Feds dearly love to do–make up laws as they go along that will allow them to implement their neo-Marxist agendas. Nullification properly combats this and more states seem to finally be waking up to this.

In Texas, four state legislators have introduced HB1215 (the Texas State Sovereignty Act). If passed this will create in Texas the situation that will enable that state to “review federal actions that challenge the sovereignty of the state and the people for the purpose of determining if the federal action is unconstitutional.” Should any federal act fall into that category the legislators in Texas will then seek nullification from the state’s governor and a majority in both houses of the state government.

The legislature in South Dakota is also considering a bill similar to the one in Texas. And, in Wyoming there is a “Second Amendment Preservation Act” that should nullify federal gun control edicts. Similar nullification bills to protect the Second Amendment have been proposed in Alabama, Missouri, Ohio, and West Virginia. Regarding the Second Amendment, nullification measures have already been enacted in Alaska, Idaho, and Kansas.

And it has been reported that similar proposals are being debated and discussed in the legislatures of Arizona, Arkansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Tennessee. It seems as if many states in the South and West are beginning to grasp the importance of nullification in their honest desire to combat federal overreach. I wonder, at this point, where is Louisiana with its Democratic governor who seems more than willing to go along with any Democratic federal overreach proposed by the current Regime? The state legislature here in Louisiana needs to start looking at the nullification process for this state. So far they have avoided this issue which they should begin to address.

If continued federal overreach is allowed we will, in effect, become just another Marxist dictatorship. That would greatly please the Deep State in Washington but it will be the death knell for our God-given liberties everywhere else. People should start contacting their state legislators and letting them know they want them to start implementing the nullification process in their states.

2 thoughts on “Nullification is Spreading

  1. Reblogged this on Land & Livestock International, Inc. and commented:
    Texas,South Dakota Wyoming Alabama, Missouri, Ohio, and West Virginia. Alaska, Idaho, Kansas. Arizona, Arkansas, Mississippi, Montana, Nebraska, Oklahoma, South Carolina and Tennessee. All of these states have taken some sort of measure(s) to nullify the FedGov’s shenanigans.

    Looks like these Southern and Western states are beginning to grasp the importance of nullification to fight federal overreach.

  2. The RIGHT to Nullify! -Al Barrs

    Nullification, in United States constitutional history, is a legal theory that a state has the right to nullify, or invalidate, any Federal laws which that state has deemed unconstitutional with respect to the United States Constitution. The theory of nullification has NEVER been legally upheld by Federal courts.

    The doctrine was based on the theory that the Union is a voluntary compact of states and that the federal government has no right to exercise powers not specifically assigned to it by the U.S. Constitution. The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions declared (1799) nullification to be the rightful remedy by the states for all unauthorized acts done under the pretext of the Constitution. A closely reasoned reinforcement to the doctrine of nullification was set forth—in response to the tariff of 1828, which favored Northern interests at the expense of the South—by John C. Calhoun in his South Carolina Exposition (1828). The strong pro-Union stand of President Jackson brought forth further remonstrances from Southern leaders. After enactment of the tariff act of 1832 South Carolina called a state convention, which passed (1832) the ordinance of nullification. This ordinance declared the tariff laws null and void, and a series of enactments in South Carolina put the state in a position to resist by force any attempt of the federal government to carry the tariff act into operation. President Jackson in reply dramatically issued a strong proclamation against the nullifiers, and a force bill was introduced into the U.S. Senate to give the President authority to use the armed forces if necessary, to execute the laws. Jackson, however, felt that the South had a real grievance and, behind his show of force, encouraged friends of compromise, led by Henry Clay, to prepare a bill that the South would accept. This compromise tariff was rushed through Congress, and after its passage (1833) the South Carolina state convention reassembled and formally rescinded the ordinance nullifying the tariff acts. To preserve its prerogative, it adopted a new ordinance nullifying the force bill. But the issue was not pressed further until the election of Abraham Lincoln, when the doctrine of secession was brought to the foreground.

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