Illuminism,Spiritualism, And Apostasy (one big and unhappy family)

by Al Benson Jr.

In the last article I did dealing with this unholy mess that has contributed so much to the downfall of this country I dealt with the Abolitionists and their internationalist (Illuminist) worldview. I noted how the abolition of slavery was just one small step for them in their real quest–world government.

One notable area (as if to prove the anti-Christian nature of all this) that many abolitionists got into was the Spiritualist Movement that seems to have entered this country in, guess what year, 1848.

In her book Radical Spirits author Ann Braude, who seems to have no problem with any of this, noted on page 27 that: “Every notable progressive family of the nineteenth century had its advocate of Spiritualism, some of them more than one. Anna Blackwell, eldest and most radical sibling of pioneer doctors Elizabeth and Emily and abolitionists Henry and Sam, adopted Spiritualism by 1850 and became a vociferous lifelong advocate. The ubiquitous Beecher family contributed Charles Beecher and Isabella Beecher Hooker to the ranks, while Harriet Beecher Stowe became a serious investigator…As already noted, abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison was an early convert and remained loyal to the movement until his death.  The famous Grimke sisters, Sarah and Angelina, talked to spirits…Mary Todd Lincoln spoke with her dead son, Willie, and brought mediums into the White House, where they conducted seances for senators and cabinet members.” In case you are not familiar with them, the Grimke sisters mentioned here were noted abolitionists.

And, in 1862, Lydia Maria Child stated that: “Spiritualism is undermining the authority of the Bible in the minds of what are called the common people faster than all other causes put together.” Ms. Braude went into all this in a depth I am unable to here.

Arthur R. Thompson, in his informative book, To The Victor Go The Myths And Monuments noted of the abolitionists that: “Abolitionist leaders quoted Scripture, but most practiced some form of heresy.  They lauded the United States while plotting its demise through disunion and promoted world government in some form, all in the name of wiping out slavery.” Interesting to note that it was the Northern radicals that promoted most of the disunion while the South gets the blame for it. Mr. Thompson notes that: “In January 1857, a Disunion Convention was held in Worcester, Massachusetts. Attendants included T. W. Higginson, Wendell Phillips, William Lloyd Garrison, E. M. Hosmer, Stephen Foster, Samuel J. May Jr., and John Brown,with Francis W. Bird as the president of the convention. The aim was to discuss the steps necessary to dissolve the union. What it really did was to furnish yet more proof to Southern sensibilities that abolitionists were out to destroy America–at the minimum it supplied evidence  that certain elements in the North would just as soon have the South out of the United States.” James Redpath, an abolitionist propagandist posing as a journalist covered the event. One can just imagine what he reported, as he was one of those “journalists” that later lionized terrorist John Brown. Any of you ever remember reading about this in your “history” books? Didn’t think so, neither did I. Another inconvenient little historical tidbit we were not supposed to know about.

Mr. Thompson also noted that “The use of what was known as Transcendentalism and spiritualism in the 1800s was designed to break down the existing social and religious structure.” Transcendentalism was a radical form of Unitarianism and most by now are beginning to realize what spiritualism was. Not only was the Spiritualist Movement alive and well in abolitionist circles but it was also thriving in the Feminist Movement of that day.

Ann Braude observed that “The American woman’s rights movement drew its first breaths in an atmosphere alive with the rumors of angels. Members of the Waterloo Friends flocked to nearby Seneca Falls and figured prominently in the convention’s proceedings. Raps reportedly rocked the same table where Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton penned the ‘Declaration of Sentiments’ which formed the convention’s agenda…From this time on, Spiritualism and woman’s rights intertwined repeatedly as both became mass movements that challenged the existing norms of American life…’Spiritualism has inaugurated the era of woman’ Mary Davis proclaimed.  She recalled the common birthdate of the new religion and woman’s rights in 1848. ‘Since that time Spiritualism has promoted the cause of woman more than any other movement’ Davis explained.” So what does this lady’s comment tell you about the Feminist Movement, both yesterday and today? If the tree had bad roots, can the fruit be any better?

In our book Lincoln’s Marxists Donnie Kennedy and I have included an addendum on page 307 called Feminists and Forty Eighters. It gives you a little more information on some of those in the Feminist Movement in both this country and Europe who had ties with and affinity for socialism. This movement in this country today is another part of the Illuminist/Marxist push toward One World Government and the more you study it the more apparent that will become. Combine that with the Spiritualist Movement and the current apostasy going forward in many churches today and you really have a toxic and spiritually cancerous mix, guaranteed to infect any it touches.

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2 thoughts on “Illuminism,Spiritualism, And Apostasy (one big and unhappy family)

  1. Pingback: Illuminism,Spiritualism, And Apostasy (one big and unhappy family) – Truth Troubles: Why people hate the truths' of the real world

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