Some Thoughts On Education

by Al Benson Jr.

Looking at our past and present situation in America we can say with some certainty that what was or is good in what is left of this republic is solely the result of the Christian Gospel, Christian education, and a Christian worldview. Some, not wanting to appear “religious” may dispute that statement, but a correct study of American history will only prove the point.

For anyone wanting evidence of this I would recommend Rev. Steve Wilkins American history lectures entitled America the First 350 Years which is available on MP3. I have listened to Rev. Wilkins’ series three or four times over the years and the bibliography of books he gives to support his thesis is impressive.

Also, we have been informed (falsely so) by many “historians” who seek to convey the impression that the public school played a key role in the shaping of our national character in our early days. Many supposedly knowledgeable conservatives  have fallen for this line and I have heard it parroted in many quarters by people who ought to know better.

In actuality, the more public education gained a serious foothold in this country the more God was left out. As this trend continued, more noticeably in recent years, there was no place to turn for a remedy except to Christian education, both in Christian schools and at home (home schooling). The public education Leviathan, in its march toward complete de-christianization  and collectivization of American society,  was and is not about to be reformed from that which it was created to accomplish. A good book to read on this subject is R. J. Rushdoony’s The Messianic Character of American Education.

Zach Montgomery, Assistant Attorney General of the United States, wrote a book published way back in 1886 called The School Question. The book contained Montgomery’s views on public education based on a study he had done. From his statistical study Montgomery proved that there was a definite link between the rise of “statist education” (public schools) and the rise in delinquency, suicide, and criminality.

From this, and other research that has been done since, as well as from Marxist penetration of the public school system over many years, we must conclude that TRUE education is a personal and religious responsibility. True education cannot be rightly delegated by Christians to the state.

How can true education in the biblical context take place in a “public” institution, many of whose educators are dedicated to antibiblical  presuppositions? If you think such a question is absurd, take a look at the number of educators in leading universities that signed the Humanist Manifesto. Take a good look at the ten points of the Communist Manifesto, where Marx advocated “Free education for all children in public schools…” The anti-Christ philosophy of such men, along with the Unitarianism of Horace Mann, is what has shaped “our” public school system. So we must ask–when will Christian parents, if ever, get around to asking themselves–how can my children be truly educated in an environment that is hostile to the faith I profess? Already knowing the answer, many just ignore the question. It’s easier that way.

Many Christians who continue to expose their children to the public schools (and then wonder why they have trouble with them) have come up with the fatuous notion that they can keep their kids in public schools to teach them to “critique the culture” around them. In other words, the kids are supposed to study the public school culture around them and pick out what’s good and what’s bad. Honestly now, can you just picture the average 7 or 8-year old busily critiquing  the culture in his or her public school? In all too many cases this faulty rationale has become a subtle cop-out for the Christian parent who does not want to shoulder the responsibility for the Christian education of his children! Does that sound hard?  If it does, then maybe parents ought to start checking out where they are in this critical area. The future of their kids might depend on it.

In the opinion of many, the only TRUE education is privately supported Christian education. Education that is not God-centered simply misses the mark. Therefore it is not education in the true sense of that word, or we might label it miseducation. Biblically speaking, education should be in the private sphere. The state doesn’t belong, even though they have usurped the prerogative.

And a final thought I hope you will prayerfully consider–Christian education, if it is truly Christian, should impart the concept of God-given liberty and self-government.

The true role of public education is to condition children (and their parents) to accept their manipulation by the state. Public education is an experiment (with your kids as the guinea pigs) in STATE SOCIALISM. It will ever end up lowering standards morally, intellectually, socially, and in just about any way you care to name. What has gone on in public schools in just the past few recent years should convince people of that even if they haven’t read any of the history, and if you’ve read the history, then it’s hard to argue with.

Many look at the direction this country is headed in and hold their noses, and rightfully so. The sewer awaits America unless we reverse direction. The place we need to start reversing direction is in how we educate our kids. Pray about it, because it is vitally important for the next generation–and then take your kids and secede from the public school system. You can’t reform it, but you can get your kids out of it.

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3 thoughts on “Some Thoughts On Education

  1. Thanks for this great article Al. We need to get more folks talking about this, and reading reliable sources that expose the public indoctrination system in this country. I am still going through Charlotte Iserbyt’s interviews and book, and should post an extensive article at Troublesome Creek on WordPress by the end of the week.

    David

  2. Very good article. While I agree that parents need to wake up and see that their children are given a Christian education, I think pastors, on average, as a group, are more to blame as they continue to build their individual ministries (?), and the pew-sitters follow the pastor without question. If pastors are true leaders, they would make an all-out effort to see that children get a Christian education.

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